Abstract: It is one of the ironies of our time that a global consensus on social governance, pluralism and the rule of law as the pillars of mature democratic life has never been stronger - yet achieving those goals seems harder today than at the end of the Cold War. Religious traditions that should enrich the quest for inclusive, accountable and ethical lives have too often become captive to the politics of exclusion, inequity and violence. And not only in the developing world, where most of the world's 1.3 billion Muslims live. In the West too, seemingly liberal societies have frequently failed to uphold their traditions - notably since September 11th, 2001.

Author

Dr Amyn Sajoo

Amyn B. Sajoo is a Scholar-in-Residence at Simon Fraser University’s Centre for Comparative Muslim Studies in Vancouver, Canada. A specialist in international human rights, civil society and public ethics, Dr Sajoo was educated at King's College London and McGill University, Montreal. 

 

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